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Sunday, December 21, 2014

Caste and its triple role in the political economy

Book review by-MUJIBUR REHMAN



For long, I have realised India’s political economy cannot be explained in conventional sense rooted in Western tradition of analysis of capitalism and socialism. Almost every significant mind of India’s Marxist tradition came from upper caste background, and they failed to realise how pernicious the caste could be; and fell into the trap of class analysis — almost to the extent of not recognising caste at all. Consequently, Marx or Gramsci decisively displaced Ambedkar in the narrative of India’s suffering. In the radical intellectual world, it was more glamorous to be a Marxist than an Ambedkarite; and that romance with Marxism continues. Perhaps, sub-consciously, they became accomplices to what Gopal Guru calls the “silencing of Ambedkar” as much as India’s ruling regimes.
The never-ending debate whether class or caste has more explanatory power that dominated the 20th century remains alive even today. In the post-Mandal era, with the rise of caste-based parties, there is growing evidence that the intellectual wind has been in favour of caste rather than class. Barbara Hariss-White’s path-breaking book, India Working (Cambridge, 2003) shook up the class-inspired tradition of analysis. And it raised a few more questions that inspired further research that led to this book. In a way, it is a rehabilitation of the long-neglected caste factor in India’s political economy. In that sense, it is a pioneering work.
Given that the usual stuff has not addressed the issue of poverty either in India or elsewhere with adequate satisfaction, we have good reason why we should be generous in welcoming this unusual book. Three of its main chapters run to only 77 pages. The remaining 106 pages are full of maps depicting vital comparative data about the participation of Dalits and Adivasis in India’s business economy. These maps offer more useful insights than scholarly essays about discrimination, caste influence and general questions about capital or capitalism.
The first essay, about Dalit capital in market India, recalls how Jyotibha Phule and Ambedkar drew attention to two particular kinds of discrimination: British and Brahmanical. British colonial institutions gave some normative tools that some Dalits could use to fight the Brahmanical order and the fight continues. According to this research, caste is no longer a matter of pollution and purity after liberalisation but of difference and solidarity. But then in post-liberalised India, caste networks play a vital role. These networks are weak in the case of Indian Dalits. On the other hand, the state has become a primary means of reproducing caste ideology. Having failed to remove non-secular institutions, the state has also perpetuated deprivation caused by private property. Thus, the book argues that caste becomes an instrument of hegemony, and is a civil social institution of capitalist accumulation. It contributes to the blurring of the fine distinction between economy and society by being operative as ideology, as institutional structure, and as a set of political-economic relationships.
The next chapter is based on a case study of a small town in South India. It explores how scheduled and backward castes are placed and operate in the social structure of accumulation. It concludes that caste plays a key role in organising and sustaining accumulation. As labour and as employers and accumulators, Dalits are central to this process. Caste is the key pillar of ideology on which the town presents itself as a unified body. What is interesting to note is that the interplay of caste and the economy may be differentiated but is consistent with corporatism. This chapter recognises that education and reservations have helped Dalits change their professions from sanitary workers and agricultural workers to more diversified professions and even politics, but wealth creation for Dalits has to take place in India’s informal capitalist economy. This research suggests that caste plays a triple role. First, it provides what the author calls “ideological backcloth” for the corporatist organisations; Secondly, its working is consistent with the institutionalisation structure of the evolving corporatist organisations; and finally, caste also creates conditions for the overlap between economy and society necessary for the working of the corporatist project. The research findings suggest that the small town societal corporatist regime of accumulation resembles Gramsci’s concept of civil society. What is remarkable is that, according to the authors, the political, cultural and ideological hegemony of a single social group — the capitalist class — over the rest remains intact and operational.
The final chapter is about regions of discrimination against Dalits and Adivasis in India’s business economy. It examines the patterns of incorporation of both Dalits and Adivasis into the business economy not as labour but as owners of firms. More than 70 maps of state-level patterns are published in this Atlas, covering the period from 1990 to 2005, and they focus on 14 sectors of the economy. The data are drawn from Census, Economic Census and the National Sample Survey (NSS). They show uneven effects of discrimination across four dimensions: across scales — variations across macro-regions; secondly, variations across sectors of agriculture and the non-firm economy; thirdly, differences in the trajectory of incorporation of regions and sectors over time; and fourth, the differences between Dalit and Adivasis, the latter intensifying over time, Adivasis positively, but Dalits sometimes negatively.
This indispensable volume for students of India’s political economy and development studies offers fresh insights to a debate that seems to be frozen in various rival schools that either calls for state-led development or market-oriented reform, without realising that both institutions could be paralysed by caste factors. The exciting thing is that this book offers concrete evidence to that end.
Source: The Hindu dt 16-12-14
Q & A - `Fears over Sanskrit are emotional ­ with - clear caste and religious overtones'

Ganesh Devy is a Padma Shri awardee and Unesco Linguapax laureate who headed the People's Linguistic Survey of India 2010. Speaking with Robin David, Devy discussed why qualms around Sanskrit are emotional, effective ways of preserving Sanskrit's heritage ­ and which languages merit equal attention:
Why do you say the current debate over reviving Sanskrit is more emotional than practical?
Today, very few people claim Sanskrit as their first language ­ it's not possible to buy a train ticket or even get Ayurveda medicine us ing Sanskrit. It is not a language of use any more. It's not been a language of use in India since the 17th century ­ and we're now in the 21st century. So, to whip up emotions about losing Sanskrit, then reviving it, is a purely emotive effort.
It is true that modern Indian languages are based on Sanskrit. But it is also true that modern Indian languages have been in existence for nearly 1,000 years now and can be studied seriously on their own. For great scholarship in English, you no longer have to study Latin and Greek.
It's an emotional issue ­ and it has very clear overtones of caste and religious identities.
You've fought to ensure certain languages don't die ­ why shouldn't Sanskrit be amongst those languages?

I fight for languages spoken by peo ple in communities. They need to live on, so that the communities can continue their existence with dignity.
Some languages are seen as less important. Tribal languages are seen as inferior and backward. That is not desirable. But with Sanskrit, no one will ever look at its use as a sign of backwardness. On the contrary , if there's an individual who can speak or write Sanskrit, that's seen as a sign of scholarship. The fear is, we might forget the legacy of Sanskrit, rather than the life of Sanskrit. We have to make that distinction. There are ways of managing that fear by preserving manuscripts, building good libraries, digitising Sanskrit literature. Look at how the French take care of their language.
All Indian languages together constitute less than 1% of the international web space, which is not good.
If we strive to protect all our Indian languages, that would lead to a much better situation.
Many see English as a threat to Sanskrit ­ your view?

It definitely isn't. The use of the two languages is different. In India, we've managed successfully to allow languages to have different roles in our lives.
Our banking is done in English but our birth, death and marriage rituals are in Sanskrit. Certain domains of our lives are dominated by Persian even today ­ our entire entertainment domain is managed by languag es that spring out of Persian.On the other hand, cricket comes from an English ethos.
To disturb the good harmony between different languages is not a good thing for India.
Which Indian languages de serve as much emphasis as Sanskrit?

Tamil, Telugu and Bengali ­ these are spoken by very large numbers and will survive this phase of lan guage decline.
From a business point of view also, these will be important in the future.
Source: The Times of India dt 15-12-14.
Fight against untouchability, caste system goes global

Miss Arab USA 2014, Others To Raise Awareness
While a large section of middle-class India remains oblivious to castebased discrimination, the battle against untouchability has drawn a motley crew of supporters from around the world: African-America lawyers, Russian models and `untouchables' of Japan's caste system.
Kevin Brown, a faculty at Indiana University's Maurer School of Law, has connected African-American intellectuals with India's dalit intellectuals. “We want to share our experience of overcoming racism in America with dalits in India. We want to help build a culture of resistance to the caste system,“ says Brown, who first visited India on a Fulbright scholarship, where he grew friendly with S Japhet, the sole dalit faculty member of a law college in Bangalore. Brown has had many interactions with influential members of India's dalit community , including Chandra Bhan Prasad, a proponent of dalit capitalism and mentor for the Dalit India Chamber of Commerce and Industry .
“I spoke to him about the importance of dalits setting up businesses. One thing that helped African-Americans was that they began setting up businesses in the country ,“ says Brown. Jalil Dozier, Brown’s former student at Indiana University and a practicing lawyer in Washington, has researched America’s battle against racism and the Indian caste system.
Retired American social worker Johanna Shafer is part of an advocacy group that raises awareness about the system. She feels discrimination against dalits is a serious violation of human rights.
“There are more opportunities for African-Americans to better their lives than there are for dalits in India,” she adds.
“I’ve heard hair-raising stories of the caste system,” says an American who retired from the fashion industry.
Growing up amidst America’s civil rights movement, the prevalence of caste discrimination in this day and age makes her furious. She now works with dalit women labourers in India, to help them think out of the box and discover their rights through the creative use of art.
“Dalit women often face triple discrimination, based on can’t imagine how hard it can be to be a dalit woman. When I see pictures of the hanging of dalit women in India, carried in US newspapers, I feel very sad,” says model and actress Lika Osipova, founder, producer and director of the Miss Russia Los Angeles beauty pageant, who has thrown her lot behind fighting caste discrimination.
Osipova wants more Bollywood celebrities to stand up against caste discrimination.
“I haven’t heard of Bollywood stars talk of the issue,” she adds.
Hollywood actress Rolita Fakih, winner of the Miss Hollywood Image contest this year, says she can’t believe people still think this way. She hopes to raise awareness about caste discrimination by talking about it wherever she goes and raising the issue at shows where she performs.
Guinwa Zeineddine, winner of the Miss Arab USA 2014 contest, is set to make a video on India’s caste system. “The system forces people to remain separate. It negatively influences people’s social stability. I plan to raise awareness on what’s going on in India because unfortunately, not many are aware of how the system negatively affects others,” she says. “I will promote the cause via social media and speak about it at public platforms,” says Zeineddine.
Sushant Godghate, who has a doctorate in engineering and is based in Japan, is part of the Ambedkar International Mission. Godghate says Japan’s Buraku Liberation League has pledged support for the battle.

Monday, December 8, 2014

KKM SOFT PVT. LTD.
FREE CAD TRAINING, JOB OPPORTUNITY FOR GRADUATES
Eligibility:
ü  SC/ST/Converted Christianity Students.
ü  Age Limit 18 - 33 Years.
ü  B.E/Diploma/ITI 2009 to 2014 Passed Outs (Unemployed).
ü  Mechanical, Civil, Electrical, Automobile, Aeronautical, Architecture.
ü  No Standing Arrears.
ü  Family Annual Income below Rs. 2 Lakhs.
For Further Details - Contact
9791674999/9566134141

KKM Soft Pvt. Ltd., Plot No.20,North Phased Developed Plots, Guindy Industrial Estate, Ekkatuthangal, Chennai – 32.

Documents  Required:


ü  Resume.
ü  Degree/Provisional certificate(Photocopy)..
ü  Ration Card (Photocopy).
ü  Community Certificate – (SC/ST/Converted christianity) (Photocopy + Original).
ü  Recent Income certificate.( Less than 2 Lakh per annum) (Photocopy + Original).
ü  Transfer certificate(Photocopy).
ü  2 Stamp size, 2 Passport size  photo.


Friday, December 5, 2014

The Dalits of India

Remembering the great

Messiah of the oppressed,

The exploited and the neglected, and

The Architect of the Indian Constitution.

Bharat Ratna

Babasaheb Dr.B.R.Ambedkar

On his

“58th Mahaparinirwan Diwas”'


14.04.1891-06.12.1956




06.12.2014

Friday, November 14, 2014

Applications are invited from matriculation(10 std) passed candidate for the post of postman through online pl visit www.dopchennai.in with effect from 15.11.14. Age 27 years with relaxation of 5years  for SC/ST normal candidate and physical disabled person with 15 years.  Last date 7.12.14 with 
application fee for Rs 100/- examination fee exempted for SC/ST/Women candidates.
Department of Posts
O/o Chief Postmaster General, Tamilnadu Circle, Chennai 600 002.
Notification No: REP/5-1/DR/14 dated 14.11.2014.
Direct Recruitment of Postman / Mail Guard in Postal Divisions / RMS Divisions
Applications are invited online from eligible Indian nationals, to fill up the posts of Postman/Mail Guard in Postal/Railway Mail Service Divisions in Tamilnadu Postal Circle in the pay scale of Rs. 5200-20200 (Pay Band –I) with Grade Pay Rs.2000.
2.The registration of on-line application will commence by 00:00 hours on 15/11/2014 and close by 23:59 hours on 07/12/2014.
3.The details of category-wise vacancies in Postman/Mail guard cadre is furnished division-wise under the link “VACANCIES” in the website(www.dopchennai.in). The vacancies earmarked for PH/Ex-Serviceman are included in the total vacancies notified for a particular division.
4.Candidates selected against vacancies earmarked for PhysicallyHandicapped/Ex-serviceman will be adjusted against the total vacancies of the respective category viz., UR/SC/ST/OBC as the case may be depending upon the category to which the selected candidates belong to.
5.The vacancies notified are likely to vary/change without any prior intimation or assigning any reason. The department has the right to cancel the Recruitment Process or modify the selection process with the reasons recorded in writing at any stage.
6.Any person who claims to belong to a Scheduled Caste or a Scheduled Tribe or Other Backward Class will have to produce a certificate to the appointing authority/Selection Committee at time of selection in support of his/her claim so as to make him/her eligible for reservation and various relaxations and concessions, vide DOPT OM No.36012/6/88-Estt(SCT) dated 24/04/1990 and OM No.36012/22/93- Estt(Res) dated 15/11/1993, OM No.36011/3/2009-Estt(Res) dated 02/09/2009 and OM No.36036/2/2013-Estt(Res) dated 30/05/2014. The Caste/Community Certificate issued by the following authorities in the prescribed form SC’s/ST’s/OBC’s will only be accepted as proof in support of the claim.
i)District Magistrate/Addl. District Magistrate/ Collector / Deputy Commissioner/ Addl. Deputy Commissioner / Deputy Collector / First Class
Stipendiary Magistrate / Sub Divisional Magistrate / Taluka Magistrate / Executive Magistrate/ Extra Asst. Commissioner
ii)Chief Presidency Magistrate / Addl. Chief Presidency Magistrate / Presidency Magistrate
iii)Revenue Officer not below the rank of Tehsildar and
iv)Sub Divisional Officer of the area where the candidate and or his family normally resides
A format for the same is given in Annexure I, II for SC/ST & OBC respectively.
7.Scale of Pay: Rs. 5200-20200 (Pay Band -1) with Grade Pay of Rs. 2000
8.Promotional Avenues: Eligible for writing departmental examination for promotion to Postal Assistants/Sorting Assistants after completion of prescribed minimum service of 3 years.
9.Age limit18-27 years.
Permissible relaxation of upper age limit as per Government of India orders are as indicated below:-
Category
Age relaxation permissible beyond

the Upper age limit.



Scheduled Castes/ Scheduled Tribes
5 years

(SCs/STs)





Other Backward Classes (OBC)
3 years




Physically Handicapped
PH+ Unreserved
10 years.

PH+SC/ST
15 years.

PH+OBC
13 years


Ex-servicemen
3 years after deduction of service

rendered in military from the actual age

as on the closing date for registration of

application.



Government servants
Upto 40 years of age (45 years for SC/ST
(who have rendered not less than 3 years’
and 43 for OBC).

regular continuous service as on closing


date for registration of application)





The age relaxation for reserved category applicants is admissible only in the case of vacancies reserved for such categories. The reserved category applicants, who apply against posts meant for UR category, are not entitled to get age relaxation.
2
The crucial date for determining the age limit shall be the closing date for Online Registration of applications i.e., 07.12.2014 for all categories.
For PH, Ex-servicemen/Govt. Servants candidates, instructions/guidelines issued by DOPT from time to time are applicable.
10.Reservation and Definition for Persons with Disability:
(A)Visually Impaired: Categories of Visually Impaired applicants suitable for the posts: Low Vision, are those who suffer from either of the following conditions:
a. Visual acuity not exceeding 6/60 or 20/200 (Snellen) in the better eye with correcting lenses;
b. Limitation of the field of vision subtending an angle of 20 degrees or worse.
(B)Hearing Impaired: Categories of Hearing Impaired applicants suitable for the posts: Those having hearing loss of more than 90 decibels (db) in the better ear (Profound impairment) or total loss of hearing in both ears.
(C)Orthopedically Impaired: The Orthopedically Impaired are those having extent of 40% and above of physical disability. Categories of Orthopedically Impaired applicants suitable for the posts:
a.One Leg Affected
b.Muscular Weakness.
The Applicants should possess valid Medical certificate in the forms prescribed by the Government issued by competent Medical authorities for the purpose of employment, vide DOPT OM No.36035/1/2012-Estt (Res) dated 29/11/2013. Specimen format for Form II, III in Annexure III & IV
11.Educational Qualification:
(a)For Postman: Matriculation from a recognized board or University.
(b)For Mail Guard: Matriculation or Equivalent from a recognized board or University.
12.Probation period: Two Years
13.Disqualification: A person
(a)who has entered into or contracted a marriage with a person having a spouse living or
3
(b) who, having a spouse living, has entered into or contracted a marriage with any person, will not be eligible for the said posts
Provided that the central Government may, if satisfied that such marriage is permissible under the personal law applicable to such person and the other party to the marriage and there are other grounds for so doing, exempt any person from the operation of this rule.
14.Pattern and syllabus for the examination:
14.1. The applicants shall be subjected to an Aptitude Test (Multiple Choice Questions) covering the following subjects/topics. Aptitude Test will be comprising four parts (Part A, B, C (i) & C (ii)) for the total marks 100. There is no negative marking.
Part



Syllabus




A- General Knowledge
Geography, Indian History, Freedom Struggle, Culture
(25 marks with 25
& Sports, General Polity & Constitution of India,
questions of 1 mark each)
Economics, General Science, Current Affairs and

Reasoning & Analytical ability of 10th standard.
B- Mathematics (25 marks
Number Systems, Computation of whole Numbers,
with 25 questions of 1
Decimals & Fractions, Relationship between Numbers,
mark each)
Fundamental
arithmetical
operations, Percentages,

Ratio & Proportion, Profit & Loss, Simple Interest,

Average, Discount, Partnership, Time & Work, Time &

Distance, Use of Tables & Graphs, Mensuration.


C(i)-English (25 marks
Articles, Prepositions, Conjunctions, Tenses, Verbs,
with 25 questions of 1
Synonyms & Antonyms, Vocabulary, Sentence
mark each)
structure, Proverbs, Phrases, questions from small

passage. Etc














C(ii)- Tamil (25 marks
பெயர்
ொற்ப
ொடர்

வினைத்ப ொடர்,
with 25 questions of 1

கலனவ
மற்றும்
கூட்டு
வொக்கியங்கள்,
mark each)
வொக்கிய
மொற் ங்கள்,
புணர்ச் ி,
அணிகள்,


ப ொற்ப ொடர், ெழபமொழிகள் மற்றும் வட்டொர

வழக்கில்

உள்ள

ப ொற்ப
ொடர்கள்,

வொக்கியத்
ில்
உள்ள
ெினழநீக்கம்,

துனணப்ெொட உனரநனட.


The Part A and Part B will be in bilingual i.e. English and Tamil language.
4
14.2The duration of the Aptitude Test will be for 2 hours (120 minutes).
14.3. Qualifying Marks:
General
Minimum 10 marks in each part i.e Part A, B ,C(i) and C(ii) and
candidates
40
% in aggregate. The candidate has to qualify in each part

besides securing prescribed aggregate marks.


OBC
Minimum 9 marks in each part i.e Part A, B ,C(i) and C(ii) and
candidates
37
% in aggregate. The candidate has to qualify in each part

besides securing prescribed aggregate marks.


SC/ST
Minimum 8 marks in each part i.e Part A, B ,C(i) and C(ii) and
candidates
33
% in aggregate. The candidate has to qualify in each part

besides securing prescribed aggregate marks.



15.Application Fee: Rs. 100/- mandatory for all categories of applicants who have registered.
16.Examination Fee: The Examination fee prescribed for all male applicants in General and OBC categories is Rs. 400/-. Candidates belonging to Scheduled Castes /
Scheduled Tribes / Physically Handicapped / Women are exempted from payment of Examination Fee.
17.How to Apply: The applicant can apply for only one division either choosing Postman cadre in Postal Division or Mail Guard cadre in Railway Mail Service Division. If an applicant registers more than one application on-line, his/her candidature is liable to be rejected without any communication.
1)The applicant has to visit the website www.dopchennai.in through internet enabled workstation or personal computer or laptop
2)The applicant has to go through the notification, instructions to candidates, vacancy position, FAQ carefully before filling up the application form.
3)The applicant has to keep ready
(i)The scanned image of photograph and signature in .jpeg, .jpg format in
specified file size as mentioned in the instructions.
(ii)10th Standard mark list.
4)The applicant has to fill up the data required online.
5)Finally before submitting the form, the applicant has to check all the entries made by him/her for its correctness and genuineness.
6)Once submitted, no data can be modified/altered.
7)After registration, fee challan will be generated as per the eligibility of the applicant.
8)The registered applicants should pay the required fee at any post office withE-Payment facility (listed under e-payment link of www.dopchennai.in) within 3 days from the closing date of online registration, i.e. 10/12/2014.
5
9)After payment of fee, the candidate has to update the payment details in the portal through LOGIN for completion of registration process and to take a print out of his/her Application.
10)The applicants are advised to keep a copy of fee challan, receipt issued by the Post office and application, for future reference.
18.Mode of Payment: The fees are payable in cash through Post Offices having e- payment facility. The registered applicants should pay the required fee through system generated challan only, within 3 days from the closing date of online registration i.e. 10/12/2014. The applicants have to approach any Post Offices having e-paymentfacility during working hours, (listed under e-payment link of www.dopchennai.in) and to produce Fee Payment Challan printed by him & to pay the FEE in CASH (INR) only. Once the fee has been paid, the candidate has to update the payment detail through website before 23:59 hours of 10/12/2014 for completion of registration processIn case of non-payment of fee, the application registered will not be considered for further process.
19.Examination Centre:
(i)The Examination will be conducted in the following locations: Chennai, Coimbatore, Madurai, Salem, Tiruchirappalli, Tirunelveli, Vellore.
(ii)The Applicant is required to indicate his preference of examination location/City.
(iii)The Applicants are clearly informed that the allotment of Examination Centre/City is the prerogative of the Department and any request received for change in examination centre/venue will not be permitted under any circumstances. Examination Centre is allotted as per the preferences given by the applicant. However depending upon of the volume of the candidates, the candidates will be allotted other locations also.
(iv)The Department reserves the right to cancel any Centre and ask the candidates of that centre to appear from another centre. Department also reserves the right to divert candidates of any centre to some other Centre to take the examination.
20.The Applicants are advised not to enclose/upload copies of any certificates/documents. The application registered online will be treated as Provisionaland the selection/appointment is subject to Verification of respective Certificates/Documents. The Applicant has to furnish a declaration to the effect that the all statements / inputs furnished by him/her are true, complete and correct to best of his/her knowledge and they will be supported by the original documents/testimonials as and when required/demanded. Any false/incorrect information found/detected at any stage, his/her candidature/appointment will be summarily rejected/terminated.
21.Closing Date for Registration of Application: The registration of on-lineapplication will close by 23:59 hours on 07/12/2014.
6
22.Selection procedure: The marks obtained in Aptitude Test will be taken to draw merit for each recruiting division and selection will be purely on merit basis. It is further stated that:
(a)if two or more candidates secure equal marks in Aptitude Test and they are standing in the last position in the merit list, then it is clearly stated that the candidate senior in Age will be considered for selection
(b)if two or more candidates secure equal marks in Aptitude Test and they are standing in the last position in the merit list & their ages are also the same, then candidates who secured higher percentage in the matriculation will be considered for selection.
23.Requirement to serve in the Army Postal Service: Any person appointed to the posts specified shall be liable to serve in the Army Postal Service in India or abroad, as required.
24.Power to relax: Where the Central Government is of the opinion that it is necessary or expedient so to do, it may, by order and for reasons to be recorded in writing, relax any of the provisions of these rules with respect to any class or category of persons.
25.Savings: Nothing in these Rules shall affect reservations, relaxation of age-limitand other concessions required to be provided for the Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, Ex-Servicemen, Other Backward Classes and other special categories of persons in accordance with the orders issued by the Central Government from Time to time in this regard.
Chief Postmaster General,
Tamilnadu Circle, Chennai 600002.
Vacancies in Postal Division for Postman cadre
Sl.
Name of the Division
UR
SC
ST
OBC
Total

PH*

Ex
No









SM*






VH
HH
OH











1
Anna Road HO
7
0
0
4
11
0
0
0
1











2
Arakkonam Division
5
0
0
3
8
0
0
0
0











3
Chengalpattu Division
5
1
1
1
8
0
0
0
0











4
Chennai City Central Division
25
3
0
21
49
0
1
0
5











5
Chennai City North Division
31
1
0
29
61
1
1
0
4











6
Chennai City South Division
38
11
1
17
67
0
0
3
7











7
Coimbatore Division
22
3
12
0
37
1
0
0
3











8
Cuddalore Division
17
9
1
0
27
1
0
1
1











9
Dindigul Division
4
2
1
0
7
0
0
0
2











10
Erode Division
8
2
3
0
13
0
0
0
1











11
Kanchipuram Division
8
3
0
4
15
0
0
0
2











12
Kanniyakumari Division
15
0
0
3
18
0
0
0
3











13
Karaikudi Division
4
2
0
2
8
0
0
0
1











14
Karur Division
4
1
1
0
6
0
0
0
0











15
Kovilpatti Division
10
3
0
6
19
0
0
0
3











16
Krishnagiri Division
3
0
0
2
5
0
0
0
0











17
Kumbakonam Division
6
1
0
4
11
0
0
0
1











18
Madurai Division
40
6
0
4
50
0
2
1
5











19
Mayiladuthurai Division
7
3
0
2
12
0
0
0
1











20
Nagapattinam Division
7
3
0
4
14
0
0
0
3











21
Namakkal Division
4
1
0
2
7
1
0
0
0











22
Nilgiris Division
7
2
2
2
13
0
1
0
2











23
Pattukottai Division
6
3
0
1
10
0
0
0
1











24
Pollachi Division
5
2
0
3
10
0
0
0
0











25
Pondicherry Division
7
4
0
3
14
0
0
0
0











26
Pudukottai Division
8
2
0
0
10
0
0
0
1











27
Ramanathapuram Division
7
2
0
5
14
0
0
0
1











28
Salem East Division
13
3
0
5
21
0
1
1
3











29
Salem West Division
8
2
3
0
13
0
0
0
1











30
Sivaganga Division
7
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0











31
Srirangam Division
9
0
0
2
11
0
0
1
1











32
Tambaram Division
62
11
2
0
75
0
1
0
8











Sl.
Name of the Division
UR
SC
ST
OBC
Total

PH*

Ex
No









SM*






VH
HH
OH











33
Thanjavur Division
8
4
0
6
18
0
0
0
1











34
Theni Division
3
2
0
1
6
0
0
0
0











35
Tiruchirappalli Division
12
5
0
8
25
0
0
0
2











36
Tirunelveli Division
9
3
0
4
16
0
0
1
3











37
Tirupattur Division
4
3
1
0
8
0
0
0
0











38
Tirupur Division
13
3
3
0
19
0
0
1
3











39
Tiruvannamalai Division
7
2
0
4
13
0
0
0
0











40
Tuticorin Division
4
2
0
2
8
0
0
0
0











41
Vellore Division
6
2
0
2
10
0
0
0
1











42
Virudhunagar Division
7
7
0
5
19
0
0
0
2











43
Vriddhachalam Division
2
1
1
0
4
0
0
0
0












Total
484
120
32
161
797
4
7
9
73











Vacancies in Railway Mail Services Divisions for Mail Guard Cadre
Sl.
Name of the Division
UR
SC
ST
OBC
Total

PH*

Ex
No









SM*






VH
HH
OH











1
Chennai Sorting Division
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0











2
RMS M Division
5
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0











3
RMS MA Division
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0












Total
7
0
0
2
9
0
0
0
0











Note: * PH & Ex- Servicemen reservation is for Horizontal adjustment and included in the total vacancies notified for a particular division.
7